A six-month-old baby boy buried alive in Greenland 500 years ago was part of a group of 8 mummies (6 women & 2 children)

A family of eight Inuit including a six-month-old baby boy are pictured frozen in time from 500 years ago.

Three sisters with their three daughters and their sons, four and six months old were discovered at the abandoned Qilakitsoq encampment which lies on the Nuussuaq Peninsular near Uummannaq, Greenland.

Grouse hunters Hans and Jokum Grønvold uncovered the group in 1972 in a shallow cave beneath a rocky outcrop. Because the mummies were so well-preserved the men reported their findings to the police.

A six-month-old baby boy believed to be buried alive with its eyebrows and hair still intact. The family of eight were found by hunters in  1972 at the abandoned Qilakitsoq encampment, Greenland

A six-month-old baby boy believed to be buried alive with its eyebrows and hair still intact. The family of eight were found by hunters in 1972 at the abandoned Qilakitsoq encampment, Greenland

Archaeologists believe the family died around 1475AD and the accidental mummification process resulted from the ice-cold temperatures, according to The Sun.

The shocking discovery found six women with tattoos on their foreheads and chins in the settlement on the west coats of Greenland, 280 miles north of the Arctic.

And the Inuit culture meant that if the mother passed away, her children must be buried with her, even if they were alive, to ensure the family passed peacefully to the afterlife together.

One of the women shows her teeth and dark locks preserved through the accidental  mummification process caused by the ice-cold temperatures
A close-up picture of the six-month-old baby with piercing eye sockets and wrapped in thick fur

One of the women shows her teeth and dark locks of her preserved through the accidental mummification process caused by the ice-cold temperatures (left). A close-up picture of the six-month-old baby with piercing eye sockets and wrapped in thick fur (right)

The woman's hands crossed over her body show fingernails and skin perfectly preserved. Archaeologists believe the family died around 1475AD

The woman’s hands crossed over her body show fingernails and skin perfectly preserved. Archaeologists believe the family died around 1475AD.

Hunters found the bodies stacked on top of each other with layers of skin and fur between them.

The eerie close-up of the baby boy shows the infant swaddled in a fur hood with dark brown hair poking out.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Previous post Viewers are Alarmed by The Longest-Preserved Ice Man, Tzi, in History
Next post It’s Possible That Psychedelic-related Rituals Exploited Hidden Andean Passages
Close